Sunday, 9 November 2008

In Remembrance

Remembering my maternal Grandfather ~ Georges Lobert ~ who died as a political prisoner in Camp Dora - Mittelbau
There is a street named after him in Ronse.. Belgium  for the other political prisoners who didn't come home..Remembering all ..

28 comments:

Ragged Roses said...

Big Sister is upstairs writing an essay on Second World War and we sit and remember the tales we were told and have read and have seen, lest we never forget
Mx

April said...

Another lovely, thoughtful post.

April xx

PS I've left you an award on my blog, please come and see xx

Cape Cod Memories said...

A beautiful post and a loving tribute.
hugs!
beachy xo

Simone said...

A fine tribute for your Grandfather and all the other people that didn't return home.

Gigi said...

What a lovely tribute to your grandfather, but how sad that his life, like so many others, was taken so cruelly and needlessly.
Very luckily, neither my dad or any of my uncles died in the war. My dad fought from the Normandy Invasion all the way through Europe to Hitler's Eagle's Nest in Germany, so it was pretty miraculous that he survived, as so many others did not.
When my husband and I were in Barrie, Canada last year, it was pointed out to us that many many streets in that town were named for Canadian soldiers from that town who had died in WWII. I haven't seen that done anywhere here in the US, but it should be! How nice that the people of Belgium remember their lost ones with such kindness.

. said...

My grandmother's father was prisioner in a german camp. He escaped and arrived home alive.

Alfazema

Sal said...

A wonderful tribute, Michele.
xxx

LOUISE said...

I am so, so sad for you and your family Michele. This is one piece of history that I am sure you would rather not be part of. How your grandfather suffered for freedom for all, the two-minute silence is in honour of him. You must cherish the handsome photograph Michele. x

LiLi M. said...

Your grandfather would have been proud of you that you give him this tribute. We must remember the victims of war and forget how to make a war.

It must have been very harsh for your grandmother and your mother and her siblings to carry on. To know about camp Dora must be very severe. And then there was so much poverty after the second world war.

I think it's good that a street was named after your grandfather. In my opinion in Belgium the focus is still on WW I. So much the better that he has not been forgotten.

xx L.

Margie said...

Hi, This is my first visit to your blog and I have found it profoundly moving. I think the story about your neighbour is very sad, the thoughts you write very familiar to me, and the tribute to your grandfather touching. Margie.

Kitschen Pink said...

Beautiful tribute t.x

Gingham and Flowers said...

A lovely tribute to your Grandfather. x

Josie-Mary said...

Another thoughtful post. Thanks for sharing this story with us. x

A Bun Can Dance said...

Thank you for this sensitive glimpse of how your family has been affected by the war. Remembering too, Denise.

Country Cottage Chic said...

What a lovely tribute Michele.

Dana and Daisy said...

Michele, how does this knowledge about your grandfather shape the person you've become?

When I learned about my great-grandmother's hardships, it made me feel different about my silly inconveniences in life.

I think as you are an introspective person, you have had similar responses.

http://lavenderhouse.typepad.com said...

Lovely post. My kids went to visit my grandads grave. We talked about the war and then my son said could we dig him up and have a look at him - bless - good job granny wasnt listening!

congratulations on having your pics in the magazine - very exciting for you - I suspect you havent posted about it because a you are too modest or probably b you are too drunk on champagne and adrenaline !!!!!!!!

Love Emma xxxxx

Curlew Country said...

Very moving. So sorry to hear of the loss of your friend. What a dreadful shock for her family and friends.

Hope you're doing ok, just wanted to say well done on all your hard work. I've seen you and your beautiful creations pop up in BBC Homes & Antiques, Country Living magazine and in the lovely retro shop Colloco in my home town Leek. What a thrill to see a fellow bloggers ware for sale in one of my favourite haunts. Hope your cards fly off the shelves!

Love Stephx

Chelle said...

That is so neat that they named a street after him. At least his legacy lives on and he won't ever be forgotten.

Lucy B - Vintage Floral and Gingham said...

Your such a thoughtful blogger!

x

Ziakoko said...

So moving, why can't humans learn to stop war? We never seem to learn from history do we?

Redwoodhouse said...

So moving Michelle, so many men, we do well to remember.

Petticoat Lane said...

What a lovely post and how wonderful that he had a street named after him, a part of him will forever remain.
Thank you for Edwina tip, shall pop in on Saturday and admire more of her beautiful work.
Jane. x

Vintage Amethyst said...

A lovely tribute.
Love Alison x

Anonymous said...

A beautiful post and very moving

Aurore said...

My grandfather used to tell me stories about about your grandfather when i was a little girl.
My great grandfather (Omer Ruyffelaere) was your grandmother's (Bertha Ruyffelaere) brother.
I am sure he would be very touched by your loving tribute.

Cowboys and Custard said...

Dear Aurore
I can't tell you what your comment means to me...
Please get in touch if you wish..It is extraordinary that you found me via my blog and we have this family connection..

Kind regards
Michele

Aurore said...

Dear Michèle,

I thought you would like to hear that your grandfather was and still is remembered, not only in your family, but in mine as well.

Perhaps it would be easier to get in touch by mail, if you want to. You can mail me at auroreruyffelaere@hotmail.com

I found your blog when i was working on my family tree and i was looking for the exact location your grandfather passed away, since the records give different locations.

Aurore